Original Cab Components Will Guide Appearance Of New Build Corris Railway Locomotive As More Monthly Subscribers Are Sought To Help Construction

As the Corris Railway looks to increase its rate of monthly fund-raising for the new build “Falcon” 0-4-2ST Number 10, and with volunteers looking to begin construction of the cab for the locomotive, some parts of its predecessor Number 3 have gone on display at Maespoeth Junction. These are sections of the cab which was removed during the overhaul of Number 3 in 1967 and were apparently buried at Tywyn Pendre. When the earth bank which held the remains was removed the rusted metalwork was exhumed and passed to the Corris for safe keeping.

As is well known the cab which was removed half a century ago was short of headroom and the new cab for Number 10 will also allow for the taller stature of footplate crews in the 21st century compared to their 19th century predecessors. However, the remains of the earlier structure will guide the appearance of the cab for Number 10.

Although volunteers will produce the cab for the new “Falcon” the main work is being carried out at the workshops of Alan Keef Ltd. In order to keep the construction going along continuously the Corris is looking for 200 people to subscribe £10 or £20 a month for a period of 30 months. Those who subscribe £20 will receive a limited edition Jonathan Clay Print on completion of their payments and all subscribers will be invited to Number 10’s first day in traffic in the Dulas Valley although with only 76 seats available in the Corris coaching stock not everyone will be able to travel on the very first train behind the engine. Standing Order forms (with a Gift Aid declaration if subscribers wish to use this) can be obtained from Peter Guest, 38 Underwood Close, Callow Hill, Redditch, B97 5YS. (s.a.e. appreciated). One off donations towards the work on the motion for Number 10 can be made via the website www.corris.co.uk. The Corris is calling this initiative “Helping the Falcon to Fly”.

Number 10’s construction is also being helped along by another component from its predecessor as Number 3’s former saddle tank – which was lined with fibreglass in the 1960’s — is in use as a collecting box at Maespoeth Junction with the Corris believing that it may be the largest such box in Wales. A pony truck is also amongst the displays in the Museum at Corris station which is currently being refurbished.

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